Keep Score and Manage By The Numbers

Hi, Asa here. Thanks for taking a moment to stop and watch.

The business essential I’m going to talk about in this video is Keeping Score.

If you’re the type of business leader who relies solely on a monthly income statement to measure performance, and often find yourself disappointed by the results, then you need to start keeping score during the month. Here’s why...

Don’t you love playing games and competing with your friends for bragging rights?

Yes exactly! You do, I do, and so do your team members.

But too often businesses fail to take advantage of this innate desire to win by not effectively measuring business results during the month.

If the only goal is monthly revenue and it’s not measured until the end of the month, then it’s too late to have made adjustments that could have affected the results.

And the team who likes to play games to win has no way of knowing during the month whether they are winning or losing.

Here’s an idea, how about making your business more like a game by creating a Scorecard and having some fun with it.

What I’m talking about here are key performance indicators (KPIs) that you put in place to measure key outcomes in your business that drive revenue results.

These KPIs have their own goals, are measured daily and weekly and provide the data to create a scorecard.

This simple strategy puts you in a better position to make decisions and adjustments quicker, it creates a point of accountability for your team members, and it can even lead to having more fun as goals are achieved and rewarded, even if it just for bragging rights.

Keeping score and managing by the numbers is an ESSENTIAL of every successful business out there.

If you’d like to raise your game by making business more like a game, and also gain better control and unlock its full potential…

Simply click the link at the end of this video to learn more.

I’m Asa, that’s it for now and thanks for watching.

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